Pulsating Vessels & Blood Amount - April 22, 2010 by admin

It’s not a secret that the smaller the aquarium, the more intensively it is used and the more rapid the currents in it have to be so that the same liquid can be used over and over again. It is small wonder that insects can afford the luxury of having very slow currents in their aquaria, taking 30-35 minutes to make one complete cycle. Man cannot afford this. The blood in our internal aquarium completes a cycle in as little as 23 seconds and performs over 3700 cycles per day. This is, however, not the maximum. In a dog a complete cycle takes 16 seconds, in a rabbit only 7.5 seconds, and in the smaller animals even less.

In vertebrates the matter is complicated since the aquarium itself is very large, but has little water in it. Not can it be filled up. The total length of all man’s blood vessels is about 100 thousand kilometres. Most of them are usually empty since 7-10 litres of blood are far from enough to till them and only the most hard-working organs are supplied intensively. For this reason heavy-duty functions cannot be performed by many systems simultaneously. After a good meal the digestive organs are the most energetic. They receive a considerable amount of blood, while the brain is not adequately supplied to function normally. Hence, we experience drowsiness.

To set the waters of the internal aquarium in motion, it was necessary to have devices very different from the cilia of sponges. Muscle pumps proved much more dependable. The earliest pumps were nothing more than a pulsating vessel, i. e. a very simple heart, which drove hemolymph into the smaller vessels and thence into the interstitial and intercel­lular spaces. Having watered them, the hemolymph returned to the pulsating vessel. Such an open system could not provide proper circulation, and this is why insects, the highest representatives of the invertebrates, developed pumps which not only force out, but also suck in. For this purpose their hearts are freely attached to special muscles, known as the pterygoid muscles, that stretch the heart, thus creating a negative pressure that sucks in the liquid passing through the tissues.

A pulsating vessel is a low-capacity unit, and lower animals usually have many pumping devices. In the earthworm the main pulsating vessel, that extends throughout its entire body, drives the blood from the rear to the front end. On its way, the blood flows into side vessels which themselves act as hearts pushing the blood into even finer arteries. All these numerous hearts function independently, co-ordinating, at best, their work with the partner in the segment. And this is the extent of the organization.